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Monthly Archive for February, 2012

While The Odyssey is a story that is very much centered around King Odysseus and his twenty-year long, sea-faring adventures, the story of Telemachus is also of great importance. Because Telemachus was just a baby when Odysseus left to begin his voyage, Telemachus’ relationship with his father is virtually non-existent until Odysseus conveniently returns to […]

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The episode of the Cyclops is integral to the development of the plot-Homer needs Odysseus to have all except one of his ships and also have most of his men killed, who will be seen as extraneous to the adventure which will follow. It would appear that Odysseus’s main agenda in narrating his adventure on […]

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Within the Illiad, the endless battles are enough to drive a person to tears of boredom.  It appears that religious sacrifice is The Odyssey’s bore, yet there is another daily practice that far more tedious.  Within the Telemachia, Homer details Telemachus’ sleeping arrangements.  At first glance, this is superfluous to The Odyssey’s true story, yet […]

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As the gods intervene in the affairs of mortals, their power proves limited. The gods’ intervention has a critical impact on the lives of humans and leads to a conflict between destiny and misfortune. In fact, the gods supposedly cannot change the fate of mortals, as Athena claims “not even the gods can defend a […]

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In Scheria, Demodocus, the blessed bard, sings a tale of cunning wherein Odysseus tricks the Trojans and victoriously raids the city. The bard weaves his verse, exhaling hexameters of blood and bronze, cunning and victory into the court of Alcinous. A flood of tears overtakes Odysseus as he listens, the sweet melodic waves rushing over […]

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Weaving was one of Athena’s greatest gifts to man, and in Homer’s Odyssey, she seems to be spinning a very complex web for Odysseus. One of the first few clues that Athena has been pulling the strings of the Odyssey has come from Hermes, god and giant-killer. When delivering a message to Calypso on her […]

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Welcome

This the class blog for PHIL 315.01 – The Roots of Western Thought.  It will store your papers and presentations and will contribute to our collective understanding of the text. Below please copy and paste your papers into a post.  Later, I will be posting some of my own thoughts on Odyssey 1-12, so you […]

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Question 13             When one talks about an object, being, etc, one tends to look at the aesthetics. When people describe something, they normally use an array of different adjectives to create a vision in another’s mind, but what about the essence and meaning of an object. Just because something may be orange and round […]

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           While Odysseus is known for his clever wit, impressive oratory skills, and vast array of knowledge, is his use of deception and disguise just another game that he is playing with the women he encounters along his journey? Or is Odysseus so lost in his grossly embellished tale that deceit and camouflage are becoming […]

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Odysseus’s arrival on Circe’s island depicts Odysseus as character full of hubris and god-like qualities. Circe, even with having persuasive powers over him, does not seem to deter or detain Odysseus for very long on her island. Both Odysseus and Circe seem to have the innate ability to trick or deceive. Therefore, their encounter gives […]

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