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Monthly Archive for March, 2012

An Education

Socrates dictates the kind of education and character a guardian should possess, so that from these the best are to be chosen as rulers. Ironically, the guardian’s nature will have two opposing traits; namely “he must be spirited” (375b) and to be gentle as is the “disposition of noble dogs” (375e). However, it is just […]

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Superior Socrates

Throughout The Republic, Socrates makes his arguments based on what is now termed as “the Socratic method.” Yet in his conversation with Adeimantus and Glaucon on the first and second cities, he very frequently condescends the two men—when Socrates ____ Adeimantus and when he dismisses Glaucon. While Socrates is the philosophical superior to the two, […]

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Once Socrates and Glaucon have divided the city into three classes and given them separate responsibilities and restrictions, they consider happiness in Book 4. Anytime one is defining justice, it is reasonable to consider whether a just city means a happy city and whether restricting the freedom of one class more than another class might […]

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In Book Two of The Republic, Plato focuses on the issues of justice vs. injustice and the reason for why a city of society comes about. I feel as though Plato is trying to say to people that a society or a city can come from injustice. People are always trying to find ways to […]

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After paying close attention to and considering what can be said about the gods, Hades, and heroes, the Republic has yet to consider speeches made about human beings. Socrates explains in Book III that “speeches must be made about human beings when we find out what sort of a thing justice is and how by […]

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Four virtues: wisdom, courage, moderation and justice, are considered necessary to compose a “perfectly good” (4.427e) city. At first glace, one would believe that because these four virtues are required to found a functioning city, one would think that these virtues all agree with each other and can be synchronized together to form a successful […]

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In Book Four of The Republic, there is a lot of discussion about how the natures of virtue relate to the levels of the classes in a city as well as the levels in a virtuous soul. First, in 424a, Socrates is discussing the one “great…sufficient—thing,” which is then defined further as “education and rearing.” […]

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In Book III of The Republic by Plato, Socrates introduces the idea of correct or right love between a man and a boy. He does not condone sexual relations between the man and boy, rather he is more interested in their unique relationship as lovers, similar to a father and son type of bond, which […]

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In book four there is explicit discussion about the soul and how it relates to the discussion of the city. The different classes are given corresponding levels in the soul. However, even though the soul is explicitly discussed, one has to wonder whether this too is part of the larger idea of the soul in […]

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The Noble Lie

The “noble lie” is the Myth of Metals formulated by Plato in attempt to create an order for the ideal state. The lie is based on Plato’s belief that there is a fundamental inequality among men. The order of the ideal state consist of three levels: the highest being the rulers, the middle being the […]

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