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Monthly Archive for March, 2014

In Book Eight, Chapter One, Xenophon is discussing Cyrus’ ideas towards the influence the ruler should have over his men in order to encourage them towards the good. Here these actions to influence seem to be relative to the ruler’s appearance with virtue, seeing law, and common orders. Machiavelli discusses a similar concept in chapter […]

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Twenty years has past since Odysseus departed his Kingdom to fight in the Trojan War. When he returns to Ithaca, Odysseus masks his identity allowing him to test those whom he use to know. Odysseus is specifically interested in testing his wife Penelope, whom he holds many concerns. Humans often falsely conceptualize desire for love, […]

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I think that both Odysseus and Penelope have changed the most throughout this book and through the journeys that they took individually. In some ways I feel that as the time that they had not seen each other grew the more of their true qualities came out as they waited to be reunited with one […]

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In the end of the Iliad Achilles is most definitely rehumanized. His power is clearly completely seized and he is threatened into giving Hector’s body back. “The games were now over” (24.1). There was nothing at this point that Achilles could do to win the fight. There are definitely some questions for the Trojans, as […]

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On Justice

In Book XXII of The Odyssey, Penelope’s suitors are brutally slaughtered by Odysseus and Telemachus in a way seemingly unequal to the suitors’ offenses and transgressions, leading the readers to understandably question the justified nature of the targeted killing.  This question, however, also underscores the uncertainty of whether or not Odysseus, in particular, is justified […]

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  Odysseus’s Scar             Throughout The Odyssey a detailed physical description of Odysseus is never given. The readers can assume certain aspects of his appearance such as his age and strong build but Homer never provides other details such as hair or eye color. Homer does not speak of Odysseus having a prominent nose or […]

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Political stability, according to Xenophon, is almost non-existent. The beginning of the Education of Cyrus could be described as a sermon to convince the reader that almost all governments, no matter their structure, eventually are over thrown by the people. That is until Cyrus, the Persian, who has a unique seemingly un-paralleled ability to rule […]

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Once Odysseus finally returns home to Ithaca, the goddess Athena disguises him as a lowly beggar so that nobody will recognize him and so he can safely plot the murder of the suitors in his home. The first person he meets in Ithaca while he is disguised is Eumaeus, followed by Telemachus, then his nurse […]

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It seems as though Cyrus’ education of the gods is one such that he is able to hold certain appearances and rely on different understandings when they are convenient for him. His father, Cambyses, seems to be more dedicated to one manner and understanding of worshiping the gods. The two points of view seem to […]

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Throughout The Odyssey Athena has been helping Odysseus and his son Telemachus, yet we are led to believe that she might actually be angry with Odysseus in some way. If this were true, then why would Athena go through so much trouble to disguise Odysseus and help him plan the deaths of the suitors? She […]

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