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Monthly Archive for April, 2014

In Book 7 we are introduced to the Form of Good and the idea that people have to be uncomfortable and out of the norm to see things in their real forms and to be able to learn from them. “The ultimate goal of education was described by Socrates in Book VI as a bringing […]

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After weaving in the analogies of the three waves, the ship of state, the sun, and the divided line, Plato finally discusses The Republic’s most famous image of the cave in Book seven. Yet, this image, although the most well known, seems secondary to the analogy of the sun, and questionable in regards to the […]

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All Down the Line

Socrates offers two particular images, the sun and the divided line, in Book 6 of The Republic, preparing the way for a third image in Book 7 of the cave. Glaucon returns to the dialogue for Socrates’ central exposition of what philosophy is and why it is inescapably needed. A genuine philosopher’s studies must transcend […]

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At the beginning of Book seven Socrates turns to the topic of education and proposes a scenario where humans are taken into a cave and restrained from childhood. The only light they know is what comes from a fire behind their heads and the only truths they understand are the ones presented to them by […]

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In book VI of the Republic, Plato’s Socrates strives to explain why philosophers are the subjects of scorn and hostility in ordinary cities. To illustrate these unjustified but understandable reasons, Socrates uses the image of the ship of state. On the ship the philosopher is represented as a stargazer, the man with the knowledge necessary […]

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Athens the Empire?

Thucydides tells us in his work The Peloponnesian War that during the fifth year of the Peloponnesian war there was an uprising of the Mytilenian people against the Athenian people by The People who were armed by the aristocrats of Mytilene. That revolt was squashed by an Athenian named Paches, but there was a debate […]

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Cleon’s Justice

For Cleon the Mytilene debate seems to be pretty black and white. His argument seems to align very much to that of a modern day political Realist except on one rather major point, which is he is appealing to justice. The idea of justice is something a Realist would never start with as the foundation […]

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Lindsey Pelland Professor Honeycutt Roots of Western Thought April 21, 2014   In Book V of Plato’s The Republic, Socrates introduces three waves that will need to place in the City. The first wave states that both men and women will receive the same education because there is no difference in their nature. In the […]

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In his Funeral Oration, Pericles praises Athens more than he does those that have fallen in the war.  On first reading this seems strange; it is not until going over it carefully that you see that his commentary on Athens really has to do with the kind of citizens he is trying to create.  His […]

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The Cave of Ruin

The image of the cave in Book VII of Plato’s Republic is one of the most important in all of philosophy. Though the meaning of this image is debated, in context it seems to have a least something to do with education.  Being inside of the cave seems to symbolize life without education, while being […]

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