Feed on
Posts
Comments

A Cyclical Education

Plato believes that education is a cycle. One who is perceived as an educator or a philosopher teaches his students, and in turn, he is educated by them as well. This is exemplified in the allegory of the cave. The teacher goes into the cave in order to allow the student to come into the light. Once the student comes into the light, he goes back into the cave in order to inform his educator about something new that he had discovered while in the sun. Socrates is the original liberator and educator of Glaucon, Adeimantus, Polemarchus, and Thrasymachus. In turn, they all help to further the education of Socrates.
In the allegory of the cave, someone comes into the cave and brings another person into the light. It is possible that the person freeing the other person of his bonds temporarily takes his place in order to allow the other man to see the real light. One can understand this as the person thought originally to be the teacher forces their student to learn, and in turn, they take the place of the student, for they learn something as well. This continues in a cyclical pattern in the education of both men.
Socrates describes the liberation of the slave in the cave as a man who “would be released, and suddenly required to stand up, and turn his neck around” (7.515A). Socrates also explains that “education is not the sort of thing certain people who claim to be professors of it claim that it is,” but rather a turning. (7.518B, 7.518C). Because education a turning and the slave is forced to “turn his neck around,” this can be interpreted as the student being educated. When he returns to the cave, those who are currently prisoners see no need to go out into the sun with him because “after having gone up above he returned with his eyes ruined” (7.517B). One could understand this as the original teacher not having a need to explain himself once again because his lesson had been learned once the student entered the light. When the original student tries to educate the original teacher, he meets some resistance from the teacher.
Throughout the entirety of The Republic, Socrates discusses the city-soul analogy with men who are not philosophic, but rather average Greek citizens. They engage in a platonic dialogue in which Socrates asks a question and one of the men answers him. After answering one of his questions, the man may go on to ask Socrates a question, in which he will answer. This is shown as Socrates proposes the idea of introducing new forms of education into the city. On the subject of astronomy, Socrates asks Glaucon “Shall we make astronomy a third [form of education], or doesn’t that seem right?” (7.527D). Glaucon responds “It does to me anyway” (7.527D). Later, Glaucon goes on to ask Socrates a question in which Socrates has to respond. When they speak about education again, Glaucon asks Socrates to tell him what the Muses will say about their choice in education in which Socrates gives him a full explanation of what he believes they will say (8.547A, 8.547B). This is significant because it reveals that Glaucon, Adeimantus, and the other men are not the only ones learning from this experience. It shows that Socrates is learning as well.
The education of Socrates and his students is more subtle than that of the prisoner in the cave and his liberator. It has taken Socrates at least seven chapters to explain the city-soul analogy as well as ask the other men about the soul and at least seven chapters for the group of men to come up with different questions and different situations to ask Socrates to explain.
It may be understood that all of the men have the ability to be the liberators when Socrates says “So our job as founders,’ I said, ‘is to require the best natures to get the study we were claiming earlier is the greatest thing’” (7.519C). They all must have liberating abilities because Socrates calls them the “founders.” All of the men in the dialogue have the capability to educate other people, and in turn, be educated themselves.
Socrates came into the dialogue being looked up to as an educator. He came to find that he went down into the cave and back out into the sun several times throughout the dialogue. With the help of key characters, such as Glaucon, Socrates’ head was turned and he received a new education.

19 Responses to “A Cyclical Education”

  1. Visitor recommendations

    […]one of our visitors recently recommended the following website[…]…

  2. Cool sites

    […]we came across a cool site that you might enjoy. Take a look if you want[…]…

  3. MPISERWIS.PL says:

    Visitor recommendations

    […]one of our visitors recently recommended the following website[…]…

  4. Blogs ou should be reading

    […]Here is a Great Blog You Might Find Interesting that we Encourage You[…]…

  5. Websites worth visiting

    […]here are some links to sites that we link to because we think they are worth visiting[…]…

  6. Related…

    […]just beneath, are numerous totally not related sites to ours, however, they are surely worth going over[…]…

  7. Blogs ou should be reading

    […]Here is a Great Blog You Might Find Interesting that we Encourage You[…]…

  8. Sources

    […]check below, are some totally unrelated websites to ours, however, they are most trustworthy sources that we use[…]…

  9. Visitor recommendations

    […]one of our visitors recently recommended the following website[…]…

  10. Gems form the internet

    […]very few websites that happen to be detailed below, from our point of view are undoubtedly well worth checking out[…]…

  11. Links

    […]Sites of interest we have a link to[…]…

  12. halodoktorze says:

    Superb website

    […]always a big fan of linking to bloggers that I love but don’t get a lot of link love from[…]…

  13. url says:

    Sources

    […]check below, are some totally unrelated websites to ours, however, they are most trustworthy sources that we use[…]…

  14. Websites worth visiting

    […]here are some links to sites that we link to because we think they are worth visiting[…]…

  15. Check this out

    […] that is the end of this article. Here you’ll find some sites that we think you’ll appreciate, just click the links over[…]…

  16. Sites we Like…

    […] Every once in a while we choose blogs that we read. Listed below are the latest sites that we choose […]…

  17. purisolatie says:

    Online Article…

    […]The information mentioned in the article are some of the best available […]…

  18. Sites we Like…

    […] Every once in a while we choose blogs that we read. Listed below are the latest sites that we choose […]…

  19. Great website

    […]we like to honor many other internet sites on the web, even if they aren’t linked to us, by linking to them. Under are some webpages worth checking out[…]…