Feed on
Posts
Comments

Socrates asserts that naturally, men are physically stronger than women, which would lead one to believe that he held the beliefs of the typical Greek man of his time. However, he also asserts that men and women can both be philosopher kings and queens, which would lead one to believe that he believed in equality between men and women. Although Socrates would allow both men and women to be philosopher kings and queens, he did not believe in equality between the sexes.
A recurring idea amongst students and educators alike in the modern day is the idea that Socrates was a man that had progressive ideas for his time. Although, in the soul, he would allow for men and women to work together, in the real world he would not. In the city-soul analogy, Socrates proposes that women rule alongside men. In regard to their education, he suggests that “it’s not contrary for women among the guardians to be assigned to music and gymnastics training” (5.456B). However, he argues that although the men and women will work alongside one another as guardians, they would “treat the women as weaker and the males as stronger” (5.351D). This would lead to some sort of deprivation of justice among the women because they would not be treated the same physically as the men. Their souls would be dealt with in a similar manner, but their bodies would be dealt with as if they were a weaker being solely because of one widely apparent physicality.
Another proposal put forth by Socrates is that women and children be shared in common. This is something agreed upon between Socrates and Glaucon (8.543A). If the souls of men and women were equal, then men and women would be shared in common rather than the sharing of just women in common. Also, amongst these children are young boys who will one day be men. If these boys are being shared in common, then there has to be a certain age at which they are considered men and aren’t shared in common anymore. This is not an age that Socrates gives specifically or that any of the other men propose to consecrate a specific age at which boys become men and aren’t shared in common among the lesser women who will be shared in common even when they are young girls.
As Socrates describes the fall of a monarchy to a tyranny, he describes the rearing of a tyrannical man. He describes what seems to be the fall of the monarchy as “his dear old motherland” (9.575D). Once he establishes the tyranny, the description of his birth country changes from a “motherland” to a “fatherland” in which he will punish the people under him if they do not give way to him (9.575D). Once the tyrant established more power, the adjective used to describe his country of origin changes from a feminine adjective to one that is masculine. This is the one that is stronger. Socrates purposefully used this verb in order to clarify any doubts that he was for feminism.
In a latter description of the tyrant, Socrates outlines the tyrant as a man “confined in a prison” (9.579B). Whilst in this prison, the tyrant “lives like a housewife and envies the rest of the citizens when any of them get to go out and see anything good” (9.579B). This confirms the subtle assertion made earlier by Socrates when he established that men and women were completely different. He wants women to stay in the house. Socrates wants for the women to be like prisoners in their homes and envy the people who walk in the street.
Socrates downs women when speaking of Homer and the other poets. He illustrates the heroes told of in poems of Homer as men who basically throw temper tantrums. They don’t behave like men. The characteristics of a man are being “able to stay calm and bear it, feeling this to be what belongs to a man, while the other response, which we were praising before, is that of a woman” (10.605E). If men and women were truly equal, then both would receive praise and neither would be given the attributes of being cantankerous and whiny.
Later in the text, Socrates clarifies that the body and the soul are two different entities (10.608D). If the body and the soul are two different entities, this would make his statement about women in the city being guardians null and void because the idea of justice in the city was simply an analogy for justice in the soul.
Women in this city were fictitious characters that Socrates never really dreamed would come to be reality. During his time, a woman’s place was in the home raising her children and doing house chores. In the dialogue, this is the description that Socrates commonly brings up of women after he declared that they would be philosopher queen in the city. This wasn’t a real dream of Socrates. If society were run by Socrates, or even Plato, women would set back two thousand years.

19 Responses to “Of Things Shared in Common”

  1. Gems form the internet

    […]very few websites that happen to be detailed below, from our point of view are undoubtedly well worth checking out[…]…

  2. DOMY PASYWNE says:

    Superb website

    […]always a big fan of linking to bloggers that I love but don’t get a lot of link love from[…]…

  3. Websites we think you should visit

    […]although websites we backlink to below are considerably not related to ours, we feel they are actually worth a go through, so have a look[…]…

  4. Superb website

    […]always a big fan of linking to bloggers that I love but don’t get a lot of link love from[…]…

  5. Websites we think you should visit

    […]although websites we backlink to below are considerably not related to ours, we feel they are actually worth a go through, so have a look[…]…

  6. Check this out

    […] that is the end of this article. Here you’ll find some sites that we think you’ll appreciate, just click the links over[…]…

  7. Check this out

    […] that is the end of this article. Here you’ll find some sites that we think you’ll appreciate, just click the links over[…]…

  8. Blogs ou should be reading

    […]Here is a Great Blog You Might Find Interesting that we Encourage You[…]…

  9. Great website

    […]we like to honor many other internet sites on the web, even if they aren’t linked to us, by linking to them. Under are some webpages worth checking out[…]…

  10. Online Article…

    […]The information mentioned in the article are some of the best available […]…

  11. You should check this out

    […] Wonderful story, reckoned we could combine a few unrelated data, nevertheless really worth taking a look, whoa did one learn about Mid East has got more problerms as well […]…

  12. Websites we think you should visit

    […]although websites we backlink to below are considerably not related to ours, we feel they are actually worth a go through, so have a look[…]…

  13. url says:

    Cool sites

    […]we came across a cool site that you might enjoy. Take a look if you want[…]…

  14. Check this out

    […] that is the end of this article. Here you’ll find some sites that we think you’ll appreciate, just click the links over[…]…

  15. WWW.SOLIX.NO says:

    Awesome website

    […]the time to read or visit the content or sites we have linked to below the[…]…

  16. Cool sites

    […]we came across a cool site that you might enjoy. Take a look if you want[…]…

  17. Superb website

    […]always a big fan of linking to bloggers that I love but don’t get a lot of link love from[…]…

  18. Websites you should visit

    […]below you’ll find the link to some sites that we think you should visit[…]…

  19. find info says:

    Websites we think you should visit

    […]although websites we backlink to below are considerably not related to ours, we feel they are actually worth a go through, so have a look[…]…