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Category Archive for 'Roots of Western Thought 2014'

After weaving in the analogies of the three waves, the ship of state, the sun, and the divided line, Plato finally discusses The Republic’s most famous image of the cave in Book seven. Yet, this image, although the most well known, seems secondary to the analogy of the sun, and questionable in regards to the […]

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All Down the Line

Socrates offers two particular images, the sun and the divided line, in Book 6 of The Republic, preparing the way for a third image in Book 7 of the cave. Glaucon returns to the dialogue for Socrates’ central exposition of what philosophy is and why it is inescapably needed. A genuine philosopher’s studies must transcend […]

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At the beginning of Book seven Socrates turns to the topic of education and proposes a scenario where humans are taken into a cave and restrained from childhood. The only light they know is what comes from a fire behind their heads and the only truths they understand are the ones presented to them by […]

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In book VI of the Republic, Plato’s Socrates strives to explain why philosophers are the subjects of scorn and hostility in ordinary cities. To illustrate these unjustified but understandable reasons, Socrates uses the image of the ship of state. On the ship the philosopher is represented as a stargazer, the man with the knowledge necessary […]

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Lindsey Pelland Professor Honeycutt Roots of Western Thought April 21, 2014   In Book V of Plato’s The Republic, Socrates introduces three waves that will need to place in the City. The first wave states that both men and women will receive the same education because there is no difference in their nature. In the […]

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The Cave of Ruin

The image of the cave in Book VII of Plato’s Republic is one of the most important in all of philosophy. Though the meaning of this image is debated, in context it seems to have a least something to do with education.  Being inside of the cave seems to symbolize life without education, while being […]

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There is a link between Socrates learning about money and benefiting off of others success and and learning from the elderly and growing from their experiences. While talking to Cephalus he sees and learns about a different way of thinking and seeing how people benefit from others. Not all people are able to make it […]

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Lindsey Pelland Professor Honeycutt Roots of Western Thought March 31, 2014   Books I-IV of Plato’s Republic are centered around a discussion on justice. Socrates and his companions desire to define justice and because of this desire to discover what it is justice means and put that into words, their conversation develops and changes as […]

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Socrates and the other men are conversing and believe that the gods and their tales should be eradicated from the poems and the education of young people because the gods are lustrous creatures that punish humans for the same crimes that they themselves commit. If a god, such as Zeus were to rape a woman […]

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As Socrates, Adeimantus, and Glaucon have slowly built, and rebuilt their city in search of justice, they have seemingly focused on how to protect it, and the qualities one would need to possess in order to protect it well and justly. Upon closer inspection, however, this idea seems to contradict itself as the guardians entrusted […]

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