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Category Archive for 'War, Power, and Justice 2014'

In the preface Machiavelli states that “It is not impossible to bring the military back to ancient modes and give it some form of past virtue.”(preface. 10) In the Art of War the two men who are speaking, Fabrizio and Cosimo pay every close attention to the differences between infantrymen and cavalrymen, both ancient and […]

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Keeping the Mode

Fabrizio and Cosimo have a conversation in Book I where they discuss how to build and control a good army. Cosimo questions Fabrizio on how he would rebuild and create a new army; what kind of people would be best, what ages they would be, what skills they would have, and so on. Fabrizio seems […]

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In Machiavelli’s Art of War we are told of the good man, who seems to be one that practices war, but does not make it his art.  We are also told that the current time is one of great corruption, so it would seem like one that had practiced war enough that it had become […]

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Virtue in the Art of War is a an interesting concept for the military. Machiavelli draws on ancient influences to develop his working definition of what virtue should mean for the prince and how it should be used towards his society and forces. In this paper I will also look at some of Machiavelli’s claims […]

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Athens the Empire?

Thucydides tells us in his work The Peloponnesian War that during the fifth year of the Peloponnesian war there was an uprising of the Mytilenian people against the Athenian people by The People who were armed by the aristocrats of Mytilene. That revolt was squashed by an Athenian named Paches, but there was a debate […]

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Cleon’s Justice

For Cleon the Mytilene debate seems to be pretty black and white. His argument seems to align very much to that of a modern day political Realist except on one rather major point, which is he is appealing to justice. The idea of justice is something a Realist would never start with as the foundation […]

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In his Funeral Oration, Pericles praises Athens more than he does those that have fallen in the war.  On first reading this seems strange; it is not until going over it carefully that you see that his commentary on Athens really has to do with the kind of citizens he is trying to create.  His […]

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Pericles is chosen “by the state” as “of approved wisdom and eminent reputation” (2.34.6). However, his opening remarks seem to allude to the fact that he will not be constraining his speech to the normal mode of proceeding. Therefore, while the people perceived him as one who would follow the common identity, Pericles initially seems […]

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    Book VIII chapter 1 the rulers and the ruled are debated. “But even on other occasions, men, I have often reflected that a good ruler is no different from a good father,” (8.1.1). Both types of rulers have the people being ruled best interests in mind. They are trying to do the best […]

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The Cyrus in Xenophon’s Education of Cyrus is a man who conquered most of the known world, but there was also a man who was obsessed with what was seemly.  He cares so much about appearance that it clouds everything he that he does. In Book one Chapter two, Xenophon writes that Cyrus “is most […]

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