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Category Archive for 'War, Power, and Justice 2014'

In Book VIII of Xenophon’s Education of Cyrus, we seem to get a commentary on what a good ruler is, as we are immediately given an idea of what a good ruler is from Chrysantas, “ I have often reflected on that a good ruler is no different from a good father. For fathers take […]

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Though Cyrus admits he shares the common insatiable desire for money (8.2.20), Xenophon tells us that Cyrus did everything for the sake of being praised (1.2.1).  Are these claims compatible? I think we are able to see from these two chapters, let alone the remainder of the book, that money to Cyrus, especially the desire […]

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In Book Eight, Chapter One, Xenophon is discussing Cyrus’ ideas towards the influence the ruler should have over his men in order to encourage them towards the good. Here these actions to influence seem to be relative to the ruler’s appearance with virtue, seeing law, and common orders. Machiavelli discusses a similar concept in chapter […]

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In the end of the Iliad Achilles is most definitely rehumanized. His power is clearly completely seized and he is threatened into giving Hector’s body back. “The games were now over” (24.1). There was nothing at this point that Achilles could do to win the fight. There are definitely some questions for the Trojans, as […]

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Political stability, according to Xenophon, is almost non-existent. The beginning of the Education of Cyrus could be described as a sermon to convince the reader that almost all governments, no matter their structure, eventually are over thrown by the people. That is until Cyrus, the Persian, who has a unique seemingly un-paralleled ability to rule […]

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It seems as though Cyrus’ education of the gods is one such that he is able to hold certain appearances and rely on different understandings when they are convenient for him. His father, Cambyses, seems to be more dedicated to one manner and understanding of worshiping the gods. The two points of view seem to […]

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By Book 24 of The Iliad by Homer; Achilles has known that he has two fates: either he can either die with glory while fighting in Troy, or live a long life after the war, but have no glory for people to remember him by. (9. 500) Thetis, his mother warns him that he will […]

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Many of the heroes that we see in the Iliad are semi-divine, the one that tends to be focused on the most is Achilles. Though he is not a child of Zeus, unlike some of the other heroes, Achilles is consistently referred to as the greatest of all the warriors at Troy. We are shown […]

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Nestor, the king of sandy Pylos, is considered a small and unimportant character in the Iliad compared to other Greek characters like Odysseus,Menelaus and Agamemnon. Though he is often seen as a nagging,long-winded, old king that is past his prime and enjoys reliving days past, Nestor is one of the most important characters in the […]

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Throughout book two in the Iliad, there is a struggle to gain respect from people or gods who may be more powerful than you. Also maintaining respect among people who are less powerful than you is outlined by actions of power. “Obey the commands of others, your superiors- you, you deserter, rank coward you count […]

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